His speech in Heroes' Square in Budapest on June 16, 1989 on the occasion of the re-burial of the leader of the 1956 uprising, Imre Nagy, was the first time anyone in the Warsaw Pact had publicly called for the withdrawal of Soviet troops.

Unlike their Western colleagues, who were never directly affected by communist rule, the states of the former Warsaw Pact understand not only that Russia is no longer the old USSR, having abandoned communism, but also that national identity, and pride in national identity, were the key to undoing communist rule in Central Europe and then in Russia itself.

Orban's 1989 speech was a patriotic appeal to Hungarians: it traced their battle for national freedom back to 1848.

(The only partial exception to this rule is France, which retained some sense of national pride after the war.

Liberalism has been more successful in this regard than communism was, even though orthodox Marxism also called for an end to the nation-state.

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